Volume 7 ~ Issue 4,~Version 1,~April - 2017


Paper Type

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Research Paper

Title

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Role of Moringa oleifera leaf extract on silk dye waste effluent inducedhistopathotoxicity on liver and testis of Swiss albino male mice Mus musculus

Country

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India

Authors

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Serina Khatun ||, and M. C. Varma

Page No.

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01-07

Paper Index
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XXXX
This work focuses primarily on the effects of Moringa oleiferaleaf extract on histopathology of silk dye effluent induced histopathotoxicity (liver & testis) in swiss albino male mice Mus musculus. The histopathological parameters have been taken an account. The mice were divided into 5 Groups i.e. Group I (Control), Group II (fed with 50% silk dye), Group III (fed with 100% silk dye), Group IV (mice fed with 50% dye treated with M. oleifera leaves powder), Group V (mice fed with 100% dye treated with M. oleifera leaves powder) have been taken for experiment. The dose of silk dye was 2ml/day to both groups II and III and M. oleifera leaf is given as per the standard dose (300mg/kg b.w) to both animals of group IV and V.Administration of silk dye waste result were demonstrated atrophy of germinal epithelial cells, basement membrane, and process of spermatogenesis in different stage in case of testis and in case of liver, enlargement of the sinusoidal space, vacuole formations in hepatocyte, infiltrations with haemorrhage in hepatic tissuebut used of Moringa oleifera leafs powder it was significantly recovered the damage tissues has been observed. This study suggested that the extract may have beneficial effect on histopathological constituents such as Liver and testis. Keywords:Moringa oleifera leaf powder, silk dye waste effluent, histopathology,liver, testis, Swiss albino male mice.
[1] Augustyniak, A; Waszkiewicz, E. and Skrzydlewska, E (2005): Preventive action of M.oleifera from changes in liver antioxidant abilities of different aged rats intoxicated with ethanol. Nutrition, 21:925-932.
[2] Chang, S.I; Jin, B; Youn, P; Park, C. and Ryu, D.Y. (2007): Arsenic induced toxicity and the protective role of ascorbic acid in mouse testis. Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology, 218(2):196-203.
[3] Drill, V.A. (1952): Hepatotoxic agents: Mechanism of action and dietary relationships. Pharmacol. Rev.4:42.
[4] Elhalwagy, M.E.A; Darwish, N.S. and Zaher, E.M. (2008): Prophylactic effect of green tea polyphenols against liver and kidney injury induced by fenitrothion insecticide. Pestic. Biochem. Phys, 91:81-89.
[5] El-Zayadi, A.R (2006): Heavy smoking and liver. World. J. Gastroenterol. 12(38):6098-6101.

 

Paper Type

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Research Paper

Title

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Speckle Tracking Ultrasound: Role in Cerebrovascular Imaging

Country

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Johnson City

Authors

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Pooja Sethi Zia Ur Rahman, MD ||, Ghulam Murtaza, MD ||, Aitzaz Bin Sultan Rai, MD

Page No.

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08-09

Paper Index
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XXXX
Speckle tracking ultrasound is an emerging modality. It involves tracking of ultrasound derived speckles formed by constructive and destructive interference of ultrasound waves(1). Tracking algorithms track a set (kernel) of speckles frame by frame throughout the cardiac cycle. In this way, deformation measures like strain and strain rate are calculated. Speckle tracking ultrasound has emerging applications in the field of cerebrovascular imaging.This technique has various applications as detailedas below. Laser speckle imaging during neurosurgical procedures help measures intra-operative cortical blood flow.Monitoring of the cerebral microcirculation is crucial, because tissue viability and clinical outcome depend on restoration of blood flow to an ischemic region in a timely manner. Traditionally,intraoperative visualization of vessel perfusion is routinely accomplished by indocyanine green (ICG) video angiography and off-line transit-time calculations to predict cortical blood flow.(2). However laser speckle imaging
[1] H. Blessberger,T. Binder, NON-invasive imaging: Two dimensional speckle tracking echocardiographybasic principles. Heart 96, 2010; 716-722. [2] Laser speckle imaging allows real-time intraoperative blood flow assessment during neurosurgical procedures. Nils Hecht, Johannes Woitzik, Susanne König, Peter Hornet al .Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism (2013) 33, 1000–1007; doi:10.1038/jcbfm.2013.42; published online 20 March 2013 [3] Chronic monitoring of vascular progression after ischemic stroke using multiexposure speckle imaging and two-photon fluorescence microscopy.Schrandt CJ, Kazmi SM, Jones TA et al. J Cereb Blood Flow Metab. 2015 Jun;35(6):933-42.
[4] Swillens, A., Segers, P., Torp, H., &Løvstakken, L. (2010). Two-dimensional blood velocity estimation with ultrasound: speckle tracking versus crossed-beam vector Doppler based on flow simulations in a carotid bifurcation model. Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics, and Frequency Control, IEEE Transactions on, 57(2), 327-339.
[5] Catalano, M., Lamberti-Castronuovo, A., Catalano, A., Filocamo, D., &Zimbalatti, C. (2011). Two-dimensional speckle-tracking strain imaging in the assessment of mechanical properties of carotid arteries: feasibility and comparison with conventional markers of subclinical atherosclerosis. European Heart Journal-Cardiovascular Imaging, jer078.

 

Paper Type

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Research Paper

Title

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Drain Site Abdominal Hernia: Known but Rare Complication of Abdominal Drains, a Case Report and a Review of Drain Site Complications

Country

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Sri Lanka

Authors

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M B Samarawickrama ||, R W Senavirathna ||, U I Hapuarachchi

Page No.

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10-14

Paper Index
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XXXX

Drains are being used in abdominal surgery since Hippocrates time therapeutically and prohpylactically aiming to reduce morbidity and early recovery of patients. But these drains are not without complications. The complications range from simple drain site infection to drain site hernia of bowel leading to strangulation and necrosis. We report a case of drain site hernia (DSH) in a 47 year-old women who presented with obstructed large incisional hernia through a previous laparotomy scar. During surgery for the incisional hernia an incarcerated DSH was identified at her right iliac fossa region. Both herniae were repaired successfully and patient's recovery was uneventful. We reviewed the literature regarding the drain site hernia and other complications of abdominal drains. The article describes types of drains, their complications and predisposing factors for those complications and the steps to be taken for the prevention.

Key words: Abdominal Drains, Hernia, Complications, Predisposing Factors, Prevention

[1] Memon MA, Memon MI, Donohue JH. Abdominal Drains: a Brief Historical Review. Ir Med J 2001; 94:164- 166.
[2] Dr. Rahul Gupta, Dr. Ashok Kumar Gupta, Dr Dev Kumar Kasliwal, et al. Is Abdominal Drain a Double Edged Sword? SharmaIndian Journal of Basic and Applied Medical Research; March 2014: Vol.-3, Issue- 2, P.661-664
[3] A. G. Radhika, and Gita Radhakrishnan. Fallopian Tube Herniation: An Unusual Complication of Surgical Drain Lipi Sharma, Alpana Singh, Sruthi Bhaskaran. Case Reports in Obstetrics and Gynecology Volume 2012, Article ID 194350,

[4] A. Loh and P.A. Jones. Evisceration and other Complications of Abdominal Drains Postgrad Med J (1991) 67, 687 – 688.
[5] Preetha Rani Kumarprasad. Drain Site Hernias - A Rare but Recognized Complication of Surgical Drainage. A Study of their Risk Factors, Management And Prevention. University Journal of Surgery and Surgical Specialties Volume 3 Issue 2 2017

 

Paper Type

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Research Paper

Title

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A review on the cell biology and toxicology within the correlation to a new achievement

Country

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China

Authors

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DuraidHamid Naji ||, MohammedBadran

Page No.

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15-17

Paper Index
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XXXX
The mixing of cell biology within the toxicology reveals the potential impacts on the elements involving cellular structures, organelles, functioning characteristics, metabolic circles, signaling pathways, as well as interactions within the microenvironment. These mentioned elements are not only involving chemicals and drugs, but one should also put into consideration other factors like food, water, as well as the air we inhale. Therefore, a level of toxicology subspecialties have been developed and will be lately defined within the development of biotechnologies and the latent understanding of toxicogenomics and ecotoxicology or aquatic, chemical, clinical, environmental, forensic, medical, occupational, and regulatory toxicology.

[1] Abraham E, Marincola FM, et al. Clinical and translational medicine: integrative and practical science. ClinTransl Med. 2012;1:1.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
[2] Alam MM, Lal S, FitzGerald KE, Zhang L. A holistic view of cancer bioenergetics: mitochondrial function and respiration play fundamental roles in the development and progression of diverse tumors. ClinTransl Med. 2016;5:3.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
[3] Chen C, He M, et al. Five critical elements to ensure the precision medicine. Cancer Metastasis Rev. 2015;34(2):313–8.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

[4] Dolsten M, Søgaard M. Precision medicine: an approach to R&D for delivering superior medicines to patients. ClinTransl Med. 2012;1:7.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
[5] He MY, Xia JL, et al. The development of precision medicine in clinical practice. ClinTransl Med. 2015;4:28.CrossRefPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar

 

Paper Type

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Research Paper

Title

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A Study of Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions in A Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital

Country

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India

Authors

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Nivethitha T ||, Manickavasagam S ||, Balasubramanian N ||, Sai Thaejesvi G

Page No.

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18-22

Paper Index
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XXXX
Adverse drug reactions (ADR's) are the major cause of morbidity and mortality and most of the adverse drug reactions become evident only when the drug enters into the market, as clinical trials conducted on drugs involve only a limited number of subjects. Cutaneous manifestations of ADR's occur more frequently, hence this study was conducted to detect the morphological pattern, the common drugs causing cutaneous ADR's and to assess the severity of the same using Naranjo's algorithm. This was a prospective study conducted over a period of one year in the department of Dermatology and the department of Pharmacology. All the ADR's reported during the study period were confirmed by a dermatologist and assessed using Naranjo's algorithm. A total of 90 Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions (CADR's) were reported during the study period. Fixed drug eruption was the most common morphological pattern of ADR. Antibiotics were the most common drugs involved in causing CADR's. Most of the CADR's belonged to Probable category. Hence this study showed that CADR's are common to the drugs widely used, and the detection of the same will enable the treating physician to withdraw the use of the suspected drug. Also spontaneous reporting of ADR's will strengthen the Indian Pharmacovigilance database.
[1] Ralph Edwards, Jeffrey Aronson K, Adverse drug reactions: definitions, diagnosis, and management, Lancet, 356 (9237), 2000, 1255–1259.
[2] Janet Sultana, Paola Cutroneo, and Gianluca Trifirò , Clinical and economic burden of adverse drug reactions. J Pharmacol Pharmacother. , 4(Suppl1), 2013, S73–S77.
[3] Rohini Sharma, Devraj Dogra, and Naina Dogra. A study of cutaneous adverse drug reactions at a tertiary center in Jammu, India. Indian Dermatol Online J., 6(3), 2015, 168–171.
[4] RP Nerurkar, MY Nadkar, SK Bichile, Need for monitoring adverse drug reactions, J Assoc Physicians India, 46(8), 1998, 673-674.
[5] J Lazarou, BH Pomeranz, PN Corey, Incidence of adverse drug reactions in hospitalized patients: a meta-analysis of prospective studies, JAMA, 279(15), 1998, 1200-1205.

 

Paper Type

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Research Paper

Title

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Evaluation of Aframomum melegueta aqueous seed extract on food and water consumption in albino rats

Country

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Nigeria

Authors

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Nosiri C ||, Anyanwu C ||, Agim C ||, and Nwaogwugwu C

Page No.

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23-26

Paper Index
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XXXX
This experiment was carried out to evaluate the effect of seed extract of Aframomum melegueta on water and feed intake in albino rats. The aqueous seed extract of Aframomum melegueta was administered (p.o) to the animals for 28 days and water and food given 7hrs daily. The animals were divided into four groups of six rats both of the males and females comprising of control groups, 200, 400 and 600mg/kg extract. There was a gradual increase in food intake which affected their body weights dose dependently. Water consumption by all the treated groups from both male and female increased significantly (P≤0.05) when compared with the control groups. The reason could be that there was alteration in the hypothalamus which is a centre that controls appetite and thirst. Conclusively, it induced Polydypsia which represents a compensatory mechanism that maintains total body fluids within normal limits and therefore could be used safely for the management of diseases.
[1] Schulz, V., Hänsel, R. & Tyler, V.E. Rational Phytotherapy. A Physician's Guide to Herbal Medicine, 4th Ed., Berlin, Springer-Verlag (2001) [2] Davidson-Hunt I. Ecological ethnobotany: stumbling toward new practices and paradigms. MASA J. 2000;16:1–13.
[3] Guyton C and Hall E. Contribution of the Cerebellum and Basal Ganglia to overall MotorControl. In: John E. H. ed. Medical Physiology. (Elsevier Inc., Philadelphia, Pensylvania, 2006) 710-711.
[4] Johan PS. Approach to Polyuria and Polydipsia in the Dog Department of Companion Animal Clinical Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of PretoriaOnderstepoort, South Africa. 2008.
[5] Chidi Nosiri , Stanley Okereke, Chukwuma Anyanwu, Chieme Chukwuduruo and Chijindu Nwankwo. Responses of Liver and Pancreatic Cells to Ethanolic Seed Extract of Aframomum Melegueta in Alloxan-Induced Diabetic Rats . Journal of Medicinal Plant Studies. 4(5): 2016, 112-116

 

Paper Type

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Research Paper

Title

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Quantitative Structure antifungal Activity Relationship (QSAR) study of a series of Schiff bases derivatives from4-aminobenzenesulphonamide by DFT method

Country

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Abidjan

Authors

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N'dri Jean Stéphane ||, Koné M. Guy-Richard ||, Kodjo Charles Guillaume ||, Affi Sopi Thomas ||, Kablan Ahmont Landry Claude ||, Ouattara Zana Adama and ||, Ziao Nahossé

Page No.

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27-33

Paper Index
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XXXX
In this work we will focus on a series of Schiff bases derived from 4-aminobenzenesulphonamide. By implementing quantum chemistry methods, at B3LYP/6-311 G (d, p) level, we have identified two QSAR models from quantum descriptors and antifungal activities against Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger strains that were accredited of good statistical performance. For model 1 statistical indicators were: correlation coefficient R2= 0.984, standard deviation S=0.514 , Fischer test F=90.753 and the correlation coefficient of cross-validation 𝐐𝐂𝐕𝟐 = 0.983. Wereas the statistical datas of model 2 were: correlation coefficient R2=0.952, standard deviation S=0.596, Fischer test F=79.022 and the correlation coefficient of cross-validation 𝐐𝐂𝐕𝟐 = 0.951. These two models showed that quantum descriptors namely dipole moment and index of electrophilie were the bases for antifungal activity of these Schiff bases. These models were validated with the criteria of acceptance Eriksson et al. for training set and Tropsha et al. for the validation set.

[1] M. A. Pfaller and D. J. Diekema,Clin. Microbiol Rev, 20, 2007, 133-163.

[2] S. Benedict and J. Colagreco,Cancer Nurs, 17, 1994, 411-417.

[3] M. A. Pfaller, R. N. Jones, G. V. Doern, H. S. Sader, S. A. Messer, A. Houston, S. Coffman and R J. Hollis,Antimicrob Agents Chemother , 44,2000, 747-751.

[4] G. P. Bodey, M. Mardani, H. A. Hanna, M. Boktour, J. Abbas, E. Girgawy, R. Y. Hachem, D. P. Kontoyiannis and I.I. Raad, Am J Med ,112, 2002, 380-385.

[5] C. A. Hage, M. Goldman and L. J. Wheat, Eur J Med Res , 7,2002, 236-241.

 

Paper Type

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Research Paper

Title

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Physiological effect of Natural Penicillin Extract on Cassava Peel Media by Penicillium chrysogenum PCL501 on E.coli Infected Wistar Rats

Country

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Nigeria

Authors

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Onyegeme-Okerenta, B.M. ||, and Ebuehi O. A. T.

Page No.

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34-42

Paper Index
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XXXX
Some physiological effect of natural penicillin extract produced on cassava peel media by Penicillium chrysogenum PCL501 on E.coli infected Wistar rats were evaluated. Fermentation of P. chrysogenum PCL501 with cassava peels – an agro-waste- produced natural antibiotics. In vitro antibiotic activity of cassava peels culture extract was tested against two clinical bacterial isolates, namely, Bacillus subtilis, and Escherichia coli. The culture extract and standard drug (commercial Benzyl Penicillin) inhibited the growth B. subtilis and E. coli. Antibiotic activity of the culture extract was comparable with that of the standard drug. In vivo antibiotic action on Wistar Wistar rats infected with E. coli showed that the penicillin produced on cassava peel was potent as its administration leads to the recovery of the infected animals. Evaluation of biochemical indices of E. coli infected Wistar rats and treatment with extract confirms that the extract is a potent antibiotic. The haematological evaluation showed a significant decrease (p<0.05) in platelet count in animals administered with both the extract and reference drug. Cassava peels are indicated as a suitable and cheap carbon source for the production of penicillin by P. chrysogenum PCL501. Keywords: Cassava peels, Penicillium chrysogenum PCL501, Natural penicillin, Benzyl penicillin, antibiotic activity.
[1] De Hoog, G.S., Guarro, J., Figueras, M.J. and Gene, J. Atlas of Clinical Fungi. 2nd ed. Centraalbureau voor Schimmelcultures, Utrecht, The Netherlands and Universitat Rovirai Virgili, Reus, Spain, 2000;1124.
[2] Backus, M.P. and Stauffer, J.F. The production and selection of a family of strains in Penicillium chrysogenum. Mycologia, 1955; 47:429-463.
[3] Veerapagu M, Jeya, K. R., Ponmurugan K. Mutational effect of Penicillium chrysogenum on Antibiotic Production. Advanced Biotechnology, 2008; 16-19.
[4] Chuan-Bao., Sun Qiu-Lian and Kong Wen-Si Xu. Efficient transformation of Penicillium chrysogenum mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens LBA4404 for cloning of Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene. Electronic Journal of Biotechnology, 2002; 5 (1):1- 8.
[5] Veenhuis M. Penicillin production by Penicillium chrysogenum: role of the microbody membrane in the penicillin biosynthetic pathway. Electronic Molecular Biology and Genetics, Journal of Biotechnology, 2002; 5: 717-3458

 

Paper Type

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Research Paper

Title

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Comparison of the Matching of Keywords of Abstracts of Articles Latin Selected Journals of Iranian Dental Indexed in Pubmed with Medical Subject Headings (MeSH)

Country

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Iran

Authors

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Seyed Javad Ghazi-Mirsaeid ||, Fatemeh Masoudi

Page No.

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43-47

Paper Index
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XXXX
This study evaluates the quality of keywords of abstracts of Latin Selected Journals of Iranian Dental indexed in PubMed with Medical Subject Headings (MeSH). Materials and Methods: The study is comparative descriptive. The data gathering tool is a researcher-made checklist. The Statistical population of the study is two Latin Journals of Iranian Dental approved by the Ministry of Health that indexed in PubMed. The Access 2013 software was used to describe data. Results: In total, 866 keywords of 208 articles were studied. On average, 4.2 keywords were in per article of selected Journals. The amount of the Exact match, Relatively match and Not match keywords in selected Journals is 39.5%, 35.8% and 24.8% respectively. More keywords of articles of both selected journals are the type of partial match with MeSH Headings or Entry Terms, and then keywords that are consistent with Entry Terms.
[1] Hartley J, Kostoff RN. How useful are "Key Words" in scientific journals? J. Inf. Sci. 2003 Oct; 29 (5): 433-8.
[2] Dutta B, Majumder K, Sen B. Classification of keywords extracted from research articles published in science journals. Ann. Libr. Inf. Stud. 2008 Oct; 55 (4): 317-33.
[3] Hamidiyeh M. Keyword. Mahfel. 2012; 1 (1): 42-44.
[4] Brandau R, Monteiro R, Braile DM. Importance of the correct use of descriptors in scientific articles. Rev. Bras. Cir. Cardiovasc. 2005 Mar; 20 (1): VII - IX.
[5] Ng K, Peh W. Effective Medical Writing. Singap. Med J. 2008; 49 (12): 967-9.

 

Paper Type

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Research Paper

Title

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Medicinal plants possessed antioxidant and free radical scavenging effects (part 3)- A review

Country

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Iraq

Authors

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Prof Dr Ali Esmail Al-Snafi

Page No.

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48-62

Paper Index
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XXXX

Antioxidants are substances that remove, prevent or delay oxidative damage to a target molecule. Therefore, an antioxidant may act to control the level of free radicals to counteract oxidative damage. The effects of medicinal plants in prevention and treatment of many diseases have been widely attributed to their antioxidants activities. This review was designed to highlight the antioxidant effects and free radical scavenging activity of medicinal plants as a third part of our previous reviews.

Keywords: antioxidant, free radical scavenging, medicinal plant, herbs

[1] Al-Snafi AE. Therapeutic properties of medicinal plants: a review of plants with antioxidant activity (part 1). International Journal of Pharmacology and Toxicology 2015; 6(3): 159-182.
[2] Al-Snafi AE. Medicinal plants with antioxidant and free radical scavenging effects (part 2): plant based review. IOSR Journal Of Pharmacy 2016; 6(7): 62-82.
[3] Al-Snafi AE. Therapeutic properties of medicinal plants: a review of plants with cardiovascular effects (part 1). Int J of Pharmacology & Toxicology 2015; 5(3): 163-176.
[4] Al-Snafi AE. Medicinal plants with cardiovascular effects (part 2): plant based review. IOSR Journal of Pharmacy 2016; 6(7): 43-62.
[5] Al-Snafi AE. Cardiovascular effects of Carthamus tinctorius: A mini-review. Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical Research 2015; 5(3): 199-209.

 

Paper Type

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Research Paper

Title

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Anticancer effects of Arabian medicinal plants (part 1) - A review

Country

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Iraq

Authors

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Prof Dr Ali Esmail Al-Snafi

Page No.

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63-102

Paper Index
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XXXX
Many Arabian medicinal plants possessed anticancer activitys by many mechanisms as tested by different anticancer tests. These plants included: Adonis aestivalis, Ailanthus altissima, Alhagi maurorum, Allium cepa, Allium sativum, Allium schoenoprasum, Althaea officinalis, Althaea rosea, Ammannia baccifera, Anagyris foetida, Anchusa italica, Antirrhinum majus, Apium graveolens, Arctium Lappa, Aristolochia maurorum, Artemisia campestris, Arundo donax, Asclepias curassavica, Asparagus officinalis, Astragalus hamosus, Bauhinia variegata, Bellis perennis, Betula alba, Bidens tripartita, Brassica rapa, Bryonia dioica, Bryophyllum calycinum, Caccinia crassifolia, Caesalpinia crista, Calendula officinalis, Calotropis procera, Canna indica, Capparis spinosa, Capsella bursa-pastoris, Capsicum annuum , Capsicum frutescens, Carthamus tinctorius, Casuarina equisetifolia, Celosia cristata, Chenopodium album, Chrozophora tinctoria, Cicer arietinum, Cichorium intybus, Citrullus colocynthis, Citrus species, Clerodendron inerme, Clitoria ternatea, Convolvulus arvensis, Convolvulus scammonia, Corchorus aestuans, Corchorus capsularis, Coriandrum sativum, Coronilla scorpioides, Coronilla varia, Cotoneaster racemiflora, Crocus sativus, Cuminum cyminum, Cupressus sempervirens, Cuscuta planiflora, Cydonia oblonga, Cynodon dactylon, Cyperus rotuntdus,

[1] Al-Snafi AE, Raad M. Hanaon, Nahi Y. Yaseen, Wathq S. Abdul alhussain. Study the anticancer activity of plant phenolic compounds. Iraqi Journal of Cancer & Medical Genetics 2011; 4(2): 66-71.
[2] Al-Snafi AE. Therapeutic properties of medicinal plants: a review of plants with anticancer activity (part 1). Int J of Pharmacy 2015; 5(3): 104-124.
[3] Al-Snafi AE. Medicinal plants with anticancer effects (part 2)- plant based review. Sch Acad J Pharm 2016; 5(5): 175-193.

[4] Al-Snafi AE. The Methods followed by Arabic physicians for treatment of cancer 4th Arabic conf . of Medicinal plants, Thamar Univ. Yemen 1999, 15 May
[5] Al-Snafi AE. Clinically tested medicinal plant: A review (Part 1). SMU Medical Journal 2016; 3(1): 99-128.

 

Paper Type

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Research Paper

Title

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Medicinal plants for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases - A review

Country

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Iraq

Authors

::

Prof Dr Ali Esmail Al-Snafi

Page No.

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103-163

Paper Index
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XXXX
There were substantial evidences that many medicinal plants decreased the risk of cardiovascular diseases. With the high prevalence of herbal medicine use worldwide, the information regarding the therapeutic use or safety of herbal remedies usually obtained from books and pamphlets, most of which base their information on traditional reputation rather than relying on existing scientific research. This review will cover the plants with vascular, hypotensive, cardiac, cardioprotective, antiarrhythmic, hypolipidemic, hemostatic, fibrinolytic and anticoagulant effects. Keywords: medicinal plants, cardioprotective, antiarrhythmic, hypolipidemic, hemostatic, fibrinolytic, anticoagulant

[1] Al-Snafi AE. Therapeutic properties of medicinal plants: a review of plants with cardiovascular effects (part 1). Int J of Pharmacology & Toxicology 2015; 5(3): 163-176.
[2] Al-Snafi AE. Medicinal plants with cardiovascular effects (part 2): plant based review. IOSR Journal of Pharmacy 2016; 6(7): 43-62.

[3] Al-Snafi AE. Therapeutic properties of medicinal plants: a review of plants with hypolipidemic, hemostatic, fibrinolytic and anticoagulant effects (part 1). Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical Science & Technology 2015; 5(4): 271-284.
[4] Shinde S, Shastry S and Agrawal S L.Cardiovascular effects of aqueous extract of Adonis vernalis. IX Annual conference of IPS , 76-77. http://lib.hebust.edu.cn/ywyfzsk/zsk/pharm-docum/b014.pdf
[5] Petkov V. Plants with hypotensive, antiatheromatous and coronarodilatating action. Am J Chin Med 1979; 7: 197-236.